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Monthly Archives: June 2015

To own your dream car,,It’s all about knowing the right people..

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First you need to buy a van.  it might not be the one you dream of owning- but if at all you really want to own one, you must first get one.

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Get a good mechanic. take it apart…. remove all the worn-out parts…

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The engine is the most important part of any car. give it a new life..over whole if necessary…

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visit the panel beater,,- watch as the van is dismantled..

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reinforce the support frame work.

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it’s now time to put it back together..

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Replace the control unit.. stability is key

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Comfort and style….

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Add flavor….

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Now you have your dream car….

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3 Comments

Posted by on June 30, 2015 in Matatu matters

 

THE JOUNEY TO OWNING A SECOND HAND MATATU IN KENYA.

Mrs. Brown is a Kenyan living and working in United Kingdom; she has plans to return home and settle here in the country sometimes in the near future. Despite owning a home here in the country, She feels the income she is getting from her rental houses in Nakuru is not enough to sustain her once she decides to come home. That’s where the idea of investing in the transport industry came to her mind.
She called our office around February and requested that i assist her in getting into the matatu business. she had made up her mind that she would try the transport sector. A week after she landed in the country, we began the search by visiting car bazaars to shopping for the right van. We sized quite a few, some good ones here and there, the price sounded right but they needed lots of paper work before the vans could be registered. There was not much time to go through all the process required for a matatu to get licensed by NTSA.

We opted to go for one already on the road. one advantage of buying a van already in the route is because It was easier to tell the condition of the vehicle and also what to expect based on what the owner is taking home. Another advantage  was the fact that the vehicle is already registered and certified by the National Transport Licensing Board it would only be a matter of transfer and renewal.

We were racing against time since she was to be in the country for under a month by which time we had to get the vehicle, comply with the entire legal requirements including transfer of ownership, Sacco registration, inspection and refurbishing the van. On the third day of our search- we found one van that fitted our budget and also had the features we were looking for- the negations started and a date was set for the change of hands. We had our mechanic at hand all during the search; he assured us that the van was maintainable

When the day finally came, payment was made, we bought the van during it normal daily routine. Our first stop was at the garage. Being a second hand van- we had set aside a certain amount out of the initial capital, to renew the vehicle. What we were looking for was the right image. The van was due for inspection in three months. Despite having a nice appearance we were not very sure about the mechanical state. 200k had been prepared for this task.
On the advice of our trusted mechanic, we bought a complete suspension system- steering, ball joints- shocks absorbers- brake system from the master cylinder to brake pads- idle arms, hand brake cable and finally brand new tires. Satisfied with the front parts, we turn to the rear suspension- the shocks were okay- we serviced the deferential, changed the transmission fluids- replaced the brakes lining and hydraulic cylinders and adjusters- leaf springs bushes, and again another set of brand new tires. It was now time for computerized inspection; this is where the vehicle is placed on various computerized machine that checks vehicle’s stability and wheels alignments-etc. most of the parts were new by now and that bridge we crossed.
We turned to the electrician- replaced broken lenses- bought new clips and connectors- rewired the dashboard to revive all signals and indicators. The next step was to check the safety requirements; we replaced broken seatbelts- bought a new first aid box and fire extinguisher – and reinforced the seats. We turned to the doors; serviced the locks, replaced worn out rubbers, bushes and winding machines. There was a small leakage at the rear end which allowed water to drip inside during heavy down pours; we decided to replace the entire boot door.
By now the van had acquired a new look and stability. It was time to check the engine; we had settled for this particular vehicle because our trusted mechanic had assured us that the engine was in sound working condition, nevertheless, we decided to give it new life. We changed engine oil, replaced air, oil and diesel filters, cleaned the radiator, added coolants and finally serviced the gear box system and added the required level of the transmission fluid. Now the van was ready to start providing transport services to the great people of republic of Kenya.
Only two things remained and these are the most import for our venture to be successful. The choice of the matatu Sacco and the crew; The Sacco provides the assistance acquired for a license from the Transport Licensing Board which allows one to operate in the route of choice. We had settled for route 125 Rongai- to – Nairobi. This route has five different Sacco societies. We visit three Sacco weighing out the advantages and what they had to offer in line with our business plan. We settled for the one with the widest coverage and better accountability. We paid the registration fee, bought cashless machines, paid taxes as required by the Traffic act, paid for change of TLB license and we were issued with the franchise to operate.
her flight back to work in UK was in a weeks time. for Seven days she watched her matatu competing for passengers in the busy Nairobi streets.

 
1 Comment

Posted by on June 24, 2015 in Its life, Matatu matters

 

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